Cork Golf Tournament Tour

Blarney Castle

Blarney Castle

Blarney Castle is a medieval stronghold in Blarney, near Cork, Ireland. It is near the River Martin. The castle originally dates from before AD 1200. It was destroyed in 1446, but subsequently rebuilt by Cormac MacCarthy, the King of Munster. It is currently a partial ruin with some accessible rooms and the battlements. There are many legends as to the origin of the stone, but some say that it was the Lia Fáil—a magical stone upon which Irish kings were crowned.The Blarney Stone is a block of bluestone built into the battlements of Blarney Castle, Blarney about 8 km from Cork, Ireland. According to legend, kissing the stone endows the kisser with the gift of gab (great eloquence or skill at flattery). The stone was set into a tower of the castle in 1446. The castle ...read more

Cobh Heritage Centre

Cobh Heritage Centre

The Cobh Heritage Centre provides information on life in Ireland through the 18th and 19th centuries, the mass emigration, the Great Famine, and on how criminals were transported to Australia for petty crimes. It also has an exhibition on the history of the RMS Titanic, whose last port of call before it sank was Cóbh (then Queenstown). From 1848 - 1950 over 6 million adults and children emigrated from Ireland - over 2.5 million departed from Cobh, making it the single most important port of emigration. This exodus from Ireland was largely as a result of poverty, crop failures, the land system and a lack of opportunity. Irish emigration reached unprecedented proportions during the famine as people fled from hunger and disease. Many famine emigrants went initially to British ...read more

Titanic Walk

Titanic Walk

The Titanic Trail is a guided tour around the streets and environs of Cobh, revealing locations and incidents directly connected to the Titanic and many other aspects of the port's history. The actual building in which the White Star Line Cobh Oark Office was is visited. The very pier where Titanic passengers departed is seen. St. Colmans Cathedral, the Holy Ground, and the site of the landing of Lusitania victims are all pointed out to the visitor and interspersed with a multitude of emigrant, military and maritime history. The trail brings the whole era of Sailing Ships, departing emigrants (almost 3 million left from Cobh) and great military fleets to life in a way that leaves a lasting impression on the visitor. ...read more

Bantry House & Gardens

Bantry House & Gardens

Bantry House (originally called 'Blackrock') was constructed in about 1700 on the South side of Bantry Bay. In 1750, Councillor Richard White bought Blackrock from Samuel Hutchinson and changed the name to Seafield. The Whites had settled on Whiddy Island across the Bay in the late 17th century, after having originally been merchants in Limerick. The family prospered and considerable purchases of land were made in the area surrounding the house. By the 1780s, Bantry House comprised some 80,000 acres (320 km²) (though much of this would not be arable). The house has been open to tourism since 1946. The gardens of Bantry House were developed by the second Earl of Bantry and his wife Mary. Inspiration was taken from their travels across Europe. The gardens contain seven terrace...read more

Desmond Castle / Wine Museum

Desmond Castle / Wine Museum

Desmond Castle (Irish: Caisleán Deasmhumhan) is a tower house located in the town of Kinsale in County Cork, Ireland. It was built as the Customs House for Kinsale about the year 1500 by Maurice FitzGerald, 9th Earl of Desmond, following the grant of the customs of the port of Kinsale to the Earls of Desmond by King Henry VII in 1497. Presumably there must have been an earlier structure on the site as the 1st Earl was Captain of Desmond Castle. It was used as a Customs House until 1641 when it was converted into a naval prison, following the construction of a new Customs House. The prisoners kept in the Castle were in the main French and Spanish, and the building became known locally as the "French Prison" as a result. In January 1747, a fire broke out, killing 54 of the pr...read more

Garnish Island

Garnish Island

Take a short boat trip to Garinish Island, set in Bantry Bay. The island has 37 acres of gardens and is renowned for rich plant forms and varying colours, which look attractive in every season. Garnish is world renowned for its gardens which are laid out in beautiful walks and it has some stunning specimen plants which are rare in this climate. The Gardens are the result of the creative partnership of Annan Bryce and Harold Peto, architect and garden designer. The island was bequeathed to the Irish people in 1953, and was subsequently entrusted to the care of the Commissioners of Public Works. Garinish Island is renowned for its richness of plant form and colour, changing continuously with the seasons. The vivid colours of Rhododendrons and Azaleas reach their peak during May and June, whi...read more

Kinsale

Kinsale

The medieval town of Kinsale is not just about food, it’s also about traditional bars, beautiful buildings, narrow streets, shops and galleries and lots of activities on land and sea. You'll find Kinsale's not just a place - it's more a state of mind! Drive to Kinsale, a delightful old town on a narrow inlet of the sea. Formerly a fishing and merchant town, today it is popular for sailing and gourmet food. Join a local guide for a short walking tour to see some historic places. Start at Charles Fort to understand the importance of Kinsale’s location for trading and defense and then walk around some of the old streets. Kinsale can easily claim its place amongst Ireland's most historic locations for this has been a centre of population, commerce, trade and fishing far beyond memo...read more

Mizen Head Signal Station

Mizen Head Signal Station

Mizen Head (Irish: Carn Uí Néid), at the western extremity of the peninsula formerly known as the Ivagha Peninsula or Uíbh Eachach, is the south-westernmost point of Ireland, is one of the extreme points of the island of Ireland. It lies in west County Cork, Ireland, and is a tourist attraction. Located on the promontory are an old signalling station, a weather station, and a lighthouse. The signalling station, now a museum, is open to visitors. The "99 steps" are a long series of steps on the pathway across to the rocky outcrop upon which the station was built. The villages of Ballydehob, Goleen, and Schull are located on the peninsula. Contrary to popular belief, Mizen Head is not the most southerly point on the mainland of Ireland. Nearby Brow Head holds t...read more