Below, you will find a list of the major touring attractions that exist in the areas of Ireland that you will be traveling through on your Ireland with Kids – 5 Star Castle Adventure Tour of Ireland. While these attractions are on your tour route, the beauty of our 7 night self-drive tours is that you can choose which of the attractions you wish to see. If there are attractions that you wish to include on your tour of Ireland but are not listed below, make sure to mention this to your dedicated tour advisor.

Blarney Castle

Blarney Castle

Blarney Castle is a medieval stronghold in Blarney, near Cork, Ireland. It is near the River Martin. The castle originally dates from before AD 1200. It was destroyed in 1446, but subsequently rebuilt by Cormac MacCarthy, the King of Munster. It is currently a partial ruin with some accessible rooms and the battlements. There are many legends as to the origin of the stone, but some say that it was the Lia Fáil—a magical stone upon which Irish kings were crowned.The Blarney Stone is a block of bluestone built into the battlements of Blarney Castle, Blarney about 8 km from Cork, Ireland. According to legend, kissing the stone endows the kisser with the gift of gab (great eloquence or skill at flattery). The stone was set into a tower of the castle in 1446. The castle ...read more

Bunratty Castle & Folk Park

Bunratty Castle & Folk Park

Bunratty Castle (Irish: Caisleán Bhun Raithe, meaning Castle at the Mouth of the Ratty) is a large tower house in County Clare, Ireland. It lies in the centre of Bunratty village (Irish: Bun Ráite), by the N18 road between Limerick and Ennis, near Shannon Town and its airport. The name Bunratty, Bun Raite (or possibly, Bun na Raite) in Irish, means the 'bottom' or end of the 'Ratty' river. This river, alongside the castle, flows into the nearby Shannon estuary. From the top of the castle, one can look over to the estuary and the airport. Bunratty Castle is now a very popular tourist attraction. The interior has been furnished by Lord Gort with tapestries and artifacts from various eras in the castle's history. Some of the sights include the 'great hall', dungeons an...read more

Burren

Burren

The Burren is a unique karst-landscape region in northwest County Clare, in Ireland and one of the largest Karst landscapes in Europe. The region measures approximately 250 square kilometres and is enclosed roughly within the circle comprised by the villages Ballyvaughan, Kinvara, Tubber, Corofin, Kilfenora and Lisdoonvarna, It is bounded by the Atlantic and Galway Bay on the west and north respectively. Strictly speaking the territory of the Burren or barony of Burren only contains the villages of Lisdoonvarna, Ballyvaughan, Fanore, Craggagh, New Quay/Burrin, Bealaclugga (Bellharbour) and Carron. The definite article (making it "the Burren") has only been added to the name in the last few decades, possibly by academics, as it had always been called Boireann in Irish and Burren i...read more

Cliffs of Moher

Cliffs of Moher

The Cliffs of Moher (Irish: Aillte an Mhothair, lit. cliffs of the ruin, also known as the Cliffs of Coher from the Irish: Mhothair) are located in the parish of Liscannor at the south-western edge of The Burren area near Doolin, which is located in County Clare, Ireland. The cliffs rise 120 meters (394 ft) above the Atlantic Ocean at Hag's Head, and reach their maximum height of 214 meters (702 ft) just north of O'Brien's Tower, eight kilometres away. The cliffs boast one of Ireland's most spectacular views. On a clear day the Aran Islands are visible in Galway Bay, as are the valleys and hills of Connemara. O'Brien's Tower is a round stone tower at the approximate midpoint of the cliffs. It was built by Sir Cornelius O'Brien, a descendant of Ireland's High King Brian Boru, in 18...read more

Cobh Heritage Centre

Cobh Heritage Centre

The Cobh Heritage Centre provides information on life in Ireland through the 18th and 19th centuries, the mass emigration, the Great Famine, and on how criminals were transported to Australia for petty crimes. It also has an exhibition on the history of the RMS Titanic, whose last port of call before it sank was Cóbh (then Queenstown). From 1848 - 1950 over 6 million adults and children emigrated from Ireland - over 2.5 million departed from Cobh, making it the single most important port of emigration. This exodus from Ireland was largely as a result of poverty, crop failures, the land system and a lack of opportunity. Irish emigration reached unprecedented proportions during the famine as people fled from hunger and disease. Many famine emigrants went initially to British ...read more

Conor Pass

Conor Pass

The Conor Pass is the highest mountain pass in Ireland. It is situated on the Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry, on the road that crosses the peninsula between Dingle Town and the coast the other side. The Mountains the Pass crosses are the Brandon Mountains and contain Ireland's second highest peak Brandon Mountain at 3127 ft. From Dingle Town the road runs some 4½ miles rising to 1500 ft as it winds its way to the pass. There are wonderful views of the coast. At the Pass there is a carpark where you are confronted with this magnificent sight. The road then carries on down towards Brandon Bay past cliffs, a waterfall and lakes ...read more

Dingle Peninsula

Dingle Peninsula

There are so many things to see, to do, to explore, to experience on the Dingle Peninsula . . . from almost 2,000 archaeological sites, to more walking than you could fit into a year, to Fungie, a bottlenose dolphin who's been living at the mouth of Dingle Harbour since 1984. There is no other landscape in western Europe with the density and variety of archaeological monuments as the Dingle Peninsula. This mountainous finger of land which juts into the Atlantic Ocean has supported various tribes and populations for almost 6,000 years. Because of the peninsula's remote location, and lack of specialised agriculture, there is a remarkable preservation of over 2,000 monuments. It is impossible to visit the Dingle Peninsula and not be impressed by its archaeological heritage. When one ...read more

Doolin

Doolin

A small fishing village, also known as Fisherstreet, on a sandy bay some 3km from Aill na Searrach, the northern end of the Cliffs of Moher. Doolin is world-famous for its wealth of Irish folk music and in recent years has been attracting crowds to spontaneous sessions and festivals or 'fleadhanna' of Irish and international music. Lots of music pubs and restaurants. Overlooked by Doonagore Castle, an unusual circular tower within a walled bawn enclosure, which has been restored as a residence. Nearer the sea, Iron Age burial mounds dot the surrounding landscape. One of Doolin's claims to fame is that it is the main setting for the PlayStation 3 game Folklore. According to the game's storyline, the Netherworld, the world of the dead is a realm that can only be accessed from one place ...read more

Gap of Dunloe

Gap of Dunloe

The Gap of Dunloe is a beautiful glacial valley in the Macgillacuddy Reeks mountain range, which dominate the skyline of Killarney. Here you may enjoy an energetic walk or cycle its rough path. The scenery all around the famousLakes of Killarneyis breathtaking and there are many viewing points around the lakes as you see above. The three main lakes of Killarney occupy a broad valley stretching south between the mountains. The three lakes and the mountains that surround them are all within the Killarney National Park. The Lower Lake is nearest to the town, it is studded with islands and has Muckross Abbey and Ross Castle on its eastern shore. Why not take the Gap of Dunloe Trip, by horseback or pony and trap through the Gap, and then by boat across the Killarney lake to Ross Castl...read more

Killarney

Killarney

This little town is world-famous due to its exquisite location beside lakes and mountains.Take a horse-drawn jaunting car ride through the grounds of the Killarney National Park to Muckross House and Gardens. Tour the house with a local guide to learn about the history and lifestyles of previous owners and perhaps stroll through the gardens on the shores of Muckross Lake. As well as being a perfect location from which to explore the south western region of Ireland, for centuries the Killarney Valley has been recognised far and wide as Ireland's most beautiful destination - being aptly titled as "Heaven's Reflex". It inspired Poet Laureate Alfred Austin to write - "If mountain, wood and water harmoniously blent, constitute the most perfect and adequate loveliness that nature presents, ...read more

Muckross House, Gardens & Traditional Farms

Muckross House, Gardens & Traditional Farms

This nineteenth century Victorian mansion is set against the stunning beauty of Killarney National Park. The house stands close to the shores of Muckross Lake, one of Killarney's three lakes, famed world wide for their splendour and beauty. As a focal point within Killarney National Park, Muckross House is the ideal base from which to explore this landscape.Muckross House was built for Henry Arthur Herbert and his wife, the water-colourist Mary Balfour Herbert. This was actually the fourth house that successive generations of the Herbert family had occupied at Muckross over a period of almost two hundred years. William Burn, the well-known Scottish architect, was responsible for its design. Building commenced in 1839 and was completed in 1843.Originally it was intended that Muckross House ...read more

Ring of Kerry

Ring of Kerry

Admire breathtaking vistas of mountains, cliffs and beaches on Ireland’s most popular drive, the 100-mile Ring of Kerry. Starting from Killarney, heading around the Iveragh Peninsula and passing through Kenmare, Sneem, Waterville (favourite holiday spot of Charlie Chaplin that now has a statue of him to commemorate his love of the place), Cahersiveen and Killorglin. Popular points include Muckross House (near Killarney), Staigue stone fort and Derrynane House, home of Daniel O'Connell. Just south of Killarney, Ross Castle, Lough Leane, and Ladies View (a panoramic viewpoint), all located within Killarney National Park, are major attractions located along the Ring. The complete list of major attractions along the Ring of Kerry includes: Gap of Dunloe, Bog Village, Rossbeigh B...read more

Titanic Walk

Titanic Walk

The Titanic Trail is a guided tour around the streets and environs of Cobh, revealing locations and incidents directly connected to the Titanic and many other aspects of the port's history. The actual building in which the White Star Line Cobh Oark Office was is visited. The very pier where Titanic passengers departed is seen. St. Colmans Cathedral, the Holy Ground, and the site of the landing of Lusitania victims are all pointed out to the visitor and interspersed with a multitude of emigrant, military and maritime history. The trail brings the whole era of Sailing Ships, departing emigrants (almost 3 million left from Cobh) and great military fleets to life in a way that leaves a lasting impression on the visitor. ...read more

Bantry House & Gardens

Bantry House & Gardens

Bantry House (originally called 'Blackrock') was constructed in about 1700 on the South side of Bantry Bay. In 1750, Councillor Richard White bought Blackrock from Samuel Hutchinson and changed the name to Seafield. The Whites had settled on Whiddy Island across the Bay in the late 17th century, after having originally been merchants in Limerick. The family prospered and considerable purchases of land were made in the area surrounding the house. By the 1780s, Bantry House comprised some 80,000 acres (320 km²) (though much of this would not be arable). The house has been open to tourism since 1946. The gardens of Bantry House were developed by the second Earl of Bantry and his wife Mary. Inspiration was taken from their travels across Europe. The gardens contain seven terrace...read more

Blasket Centre

Blasket Centre

The Great Blasket Centre on the mainland in Dún Chaoin, on the tip of the Dingle Peninsula, is an interpretative centre / museum honouring the unique community who once lived on the Great Blasket Island. This community produced an extraordinary amount of literature, referred to as The Blasket Library, which includes classics such as The Islandman, Twenty Years A Growing and Peig. The centre, which is operated by the Office of Public Works, was opened in 1993 and overlooks the panorama of the Great Blasket and its family of surrounding islands. The Blasket Islands (Na Blascaodaí in Irish - etymology uncertain: it may come from the Norse word "brasker", meaning "a dangerous place") are a group of islands off the west coast of Ireland, forming part of County Kerry. The...read more

Crag Cave & Kingdom Falconry

Crag Cave & Kingdom Falconry

Crag Cave is a colourful wonderland of Stalagmites and Stalactites. It is one of the longest cave systems in Ireland, with a total surveyed length of 3.80kms The existence of the cave was known locally for years, but it was only discovered by cavers in the 1983. Kingdom Falconry offers visitors the unique opportunity to get up close and personal with a variety of majestic and awe-inspiring birds of prey - hawks, falcons and owls. The birds of prey will provide an educational and entertaining experience....read more

Desmond Castle / Wine Museum

Desmond Castle / Wine Museum

Desmond Castle (Irish: Caisleán Deasmhumhan) is a tower house located in the town of Kinsale in County Cork, Ireland. It was built as the Customs House for Kinsale about the year 1500 by Maurice FitzGerald, 9th Earl of Desmond, following the grant of the customs of the port of Kinsale to the Earls of Desmond by King Henry VII in 1497. Presumably there must have been an earlier structure on the site as the 1st Earl was Captain of Desmond Castle. It was used as a Customs House until 1641 when it was converted into a naval prison, following the construction of a new Customs House. The prisoners kept in the Castle were in the main French and Spanish, and the building became known locally as the "French Prison" as a result. In January 1747, a fire broke out, killing 54 of the pr...read more

Garnish Island

Garnish Island

Take a short boat trip to Garinish Island, set in Bantry Bay. The island has 37 acres of gardens and is renowned for rich plant forms and varying colours, which look attractive in every season. Garnish is world renowned for its gardens which are laid out in beautiful walks and it has some stunning specimen plants which are rare in this climate. The Gardens are the result of the creative partnership of Annan Bryce and Harold Peto, architect and garden designer. The island was bequeathed to the Irish people in 1953, and was subsequently entrusted to the care of the Commissioners of Public Works. Garinish Island is renowned for its richness of plant form and colour, changing continuously with the seasons. The vivid colours of Rhododendrons and Azaleas reach their peak during May and June, whi...read more

Kinsale

Kinsale

The medieval town of Kinsale is not just about food, it’s also about traditional bars, beautiful buildings, narrow streets, shops and galleries and lots of activities on land and sea. You'll find Kinsale's not just a place - it's more a state of mind! Drive to Kinsale, a delightful old town on a narrow inlet of the sea. Formerly a fishing and merchant town, today it is popular for sailing and gourmet food. Join a local guide for a short walking tour to see some historic places. Start at Charles Fort to understand the importance of Kinsale’s location for trading and defense and then walk around some of the old streets. Kinsale can easily claim its place amongst Ireland's most historic locations for this has been a centre of population, commerce, trade and fishing far beyond memo...read more

Mizen Head Signal Station

Mizen Head Signal Station

Mizen Head (Irish: Carn Uí Néid), at the western extremity of the peninsula formerly known as the Ivagha Peninsula or Uíbh Eachach, is the south-westernmost point of Ireland, is one of the extreme points of the island of Ireland. It lies in west County Cork, Ireland, and is a tourist attraction. Located on the promontory are an old signalling station, a weather station, and a lighthouse. The signalling station, now a museum, is open to visitors. The "99 steps" are a long series of steps on the pathway across to the rocky outcrop upon which the station was built. The villages of Ballydehob, Goleen, and Schull are located on the peninsula. Contrary to popular belief, Mizen Head is not the most southerly point on the mainland of Ireland. Nearby Brow Head holds t...read more

Molly Gallivans Cottage & Farm

Molly Gallivans Cottage & Farm

At Molly Gallivan you will experience the simple lifestyle in rural Ireland before the days of electricity and modern conveniences. Molly’s enchanting cottage is over 200 years old. Her farm is complete with animals, fowl and traditional farm machinery. The house is over 200 years old! Originally a single story thatched cottage, part of which still remains, it was extended, raised and slated in the early 1900s. There has been little change since then. The house as it is today was home to one of Molly’s descendants until 1997. The large open hearth, where the fire rarely if ever went out, was the only energy source providing hot water, heat and cooking facilities. Molly Gallivan was widowed with seven small children Molly Gallivan had to call on all her resourcefulness ...read more

Muckross House, Gardens and Traditional Farms

Muckross House, Gardens and Traditional Farms

This nineteenth century Victorian mansion is set against the stunning beauty of Killarney National Park. The house stands close to the shores of Muckross Lake, one of Killarney's three lakes, famed world wide for their splendour and beauty. As a focal point within Killarney National Park, Muckross House is the ideal base from which to explore this landscape. Muckross House was built for Henry Arthur Herbert and his wife, the water-colourist Mary Balfour Herbert. This was actually the fourth house that successive generations of the Herbert family had occupied at Muckross over a period of almost two hundred years. William Burn, the well-known Scottish architect, was responsible for its design. Building commenced in 1839 and was completed in 1843....read more

Skellig Experience

Skellig Experience

The Skellig Islands (Irish: Na Scealaga) are two small, steep and rocky islands lying about 16 km west of Bolus Head on the Iveragh Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland. They are famous for their thriving gannet and puffin populations, and for an early Christian monastery that is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The smaller island is Little Skellig (Sceilig Bheag in Irish). It is closed to the public, and holds Ireland's largest and the world's second-largest Northern Gannet colony, with almost 30,000 pairs. It is about 1.5 km east of Great Skellig. Also known as Skellig Michael (Sceilig Mhichíl in Irish), Great Sceilig is the larger of the two islands, rising to over 230 m above sea level. With a sixth-century Christian monastery perched on a ledge close to the top, Great Skel...read more

Skellig Islands

Skellig Islands

The Skellig Islands (Irish: Na Scealaga) are two small, steep and rocky islands lying about 16 km west of Bolus Head on the Iveragh Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland. They are famous for their thriving gannet and puffin populations, and for an early Christian monastery that is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The smaller island is Little Skellig (Sceilig Bheag in Irish). It is closed to the public, and holds Ireland's largest and the world's second-largest Northern Gannet colony, with almost 30,000 pairs. It is about 1.5 km east of Great Skellig. Also known as Skellig Michael (Sceilig Mhichíl in Irish), Great Sceilig is the larger of the two islands, rising to over 230 m above sea level. With a sixth-century Christian monastery perched on a ledge close to the top, Great Skel...read more

Valentia Island

Valentia Island

Cross to Valencia Island by bridge to visit the Skellig Experience to learn about early Christian monks who braved a harsh existence on the rocky offshore islands. Continue your trip through the remote villages of Cahirciveen and Waterville. Valentia, one of the largest islands off the South West coast of Kerry, is joined to the mainland by bridge via the Portmagee Channel. The island is one of great beauty and contrast. The western part of the island is dominated by the barren, dramatic cliffs of Bray Head which command spectacular views of the Kerry coastline while the mild effect of the Gulf Stream results in Valentia's balmy climate and lush, colourful vegetation. In The Skellig Experience Centre you can experience many aspects of the offshore Skellig islands while remaining ...read more

Aillwee Cave and the Burren Birds of Prey Centre

Aillwee Cave and the Burren Birds of Prey Centre

The unique karst landscape of the Burren Region is home to Aillwee Cave and the Burren Birds of Prey, located in Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare. This stunning creation of nature was formed by the melt waters of a prehistoric ice age. The cave, carved out of limestone, cuts one third of a mile into the heart of the mountains. The story of Aillwee Cave began millions of years ago when streams sinking underground on Aillwee Mountain started dissolving channels through the lines of weakness in the limestone. About one million years ago the ice age began and from then until fifteen thousand years ago Ireland's climate alternated between arctic coldness and warmer periods, freezing and melting, freezing and melting over the centuries. This melting water roared and crashed its way through the Aillwee Cave greatly enlarging the passage and bringing with it large quantities of sand and silts which are still present in the inner cave. The earliest history of the cave is preserved in its roof. Aillwee is one of the most ancient caves in the Burren and perhaps in Ireland. ...read more

Blarney

Blarney

Blarney is a village in south of Ireland, located just 8km of Cork City. Blarney is set in beautiful wooded countryside, steeped in history and magical charm offers the visitor a host of wonderful things to do and places to discover.  The Centre of the village is dominated by The Square which is one of the finest things that impresses the first time visitors.  Blarney is one of the few villages in Ireland which has such a fine amenity, and today it continues to be a focal point of village life. Blarney village is a major tourist attraction in County Cork. For many visitors one of the priorities is to kiss the Blarney Stone at Blarney Castle in order to receive the gift of “the Blarney” or known as the “gift of the gab” as the locals call it. “There i...read more

CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory

CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory

CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory - the Space for Science is Cork’s fun and exciting location to learn about the Universe. Today the Castle is a science centre and is home to Cosmos at the Castle, an award winning interactive astronomy exhibition which highlights recent scientific discoveries and their implications for life in outer space....read more

Cork City & Goal Museum

Cork City & Goal Museum

Step back in time to see what 19th/early 20th century life was like in Cork - inside and outside prison walls. Amazingly lifelike figures, furnished cells, sound effects and fascinating exhibitions allow the visitor to experience day to day life for prisoners and gaoler. Situated in the unlikely setting of the former Governor's House the "Radio Museum Experience" deals not alone with the early days of Irish & international radio broadcasting but with the impact of its invention on all our lives. Stepping inside visitors are taken back in time to the 19th century wandering through the wings of the goal. The atmosphere suggests you are accompanied by the shuffling feet of inmates, each representing their particular period in Irish history from pre-famine times to the foundation of the state. the cells are furnished with amazing life like wax figures: original graffiti on cell walls tell the visual tells the innermost feelings of some inmates while a very spectacular audio visual and social history and contrasting lifestyles of the 19th Co. Cork and why some people turned to crime and some ended up in Australia....read more

Dingle

Dingle

Dingle is a harbour town set on the Dingle Peninsula in South-West of Ireland. The town also is gateway to the Gaeltacht where Gaelic is the first language. This unique town is full of surprises and waiting to be discovered. The town is renowned for its restaurants, most of which offers excellent local seafood. There is a wide variety of restaurants in Dingle, from burgers and chips to fine dining. Most places today have several vegetarian selections in their menus.  Dingle has long been well supplies with pubs, in recent years the number has hovered around 52. There are large, modern pubs and pubs so small that five’s a crowd. At night, the town comes to life as the strains of the bodhran, tin whistle, the fiddle and the accordion fill the night air as the Guinness flows. ...read more

Fota Wildlife Park

Fota Wildlife Park

At Fota Wildlife Park You can come face to face with the animals as they roam freely around the park and see them feeding and foraging for food. Our specially-constructed Cheetah Run is a popular hit as crowds can witness the speed and power that makes the Cheetah such an incredible predator in the wild while they try to catch their prey. The park hosts endangered and exotic species from around the world including giraffes, penguins, zebras, gibbons to name but a few. ...read more

Kenmare

Kenmare

Kenmare (Irish: An Neidín) is a small town in the south of County Kerry, Ireland. The Irish name for the town 'An Neidín' translates into English as 'The Little Nest'. The name Kenmare is the anglicised form of Ceann Mhara "head of the sea", which refers to the furthest point inland reached by the sea. Kenmare is located at the head of Kenmare Bay sometimes called the Kenmare River (An Ribhéar) where the Roughty River (An Ruachtach) flows into the sea, and at the junction of the Iveragh Peninsula and the Beara Peninsula. The traditional Irish name of the bay was Inbhear Scéine from the celtic inver, which is recorded in the 11th Century narrative Lebor Gabála Érenn as the arrival point of the mythological Irish ancestor Partholón. It is also...read more

Old Midleton Distillery

Old Midleton Distillery

The visitor is invited to take a one hour tour of the Old Midleton Distillery, the home of Jameson Irish whiskey. The guided tour begins with an audio visual presentation (available in 7 languages) followed by a walk through the beautifully restored industrial complex, unique within Ireland and Britain. See the fully operational Water Wheel, large Grain Stores, Mill Buildings and the largest Pot Still in the world. With the appetite suitably whetted it is now time to experience the famous tutored Irish Whiskey Tasting in the Jameson Bar (minerals available for children). After a complimentary glass of Jameson, why not visit the extensive gift shop, or have lunch in the Malt House Restaurant. In 1966, John Power & Son, John Jameson & Son and the Cork Distillers company (w...read more

Seanchaí Kerry Literary & Cultural Centre

Seanchaí Kerry Literary & Cultural Centre

Seanchaí is a museum of words & spirit where the imaginative worlds of the great Kerry writers are evoked. Located in a beautifully restored 19th century Georgian Residence next to Listowel Castle, in Listowel’s magnificent Square, Seanchaí – Kerry Literary & Cultural Centre celebrates the works and lives of some of Kerry’s most esteemed writers in a unique audio-visual interpretative museum. Seanchaí features five of the County’s most esteemed writers – John B. Keane, Bryan MacMahon, George Fitzmaurice, Brendan Kennelly and Maurice Walsh.  The writings of these national and internationally renowned literary figures are filled with an abundance of rich characters, humour, romance and tragedy drawn from the towns and villages o...read more

Staigue Fort

Staigue Fort

Staigue Fort is probably the finest example of a stone fort in Ireland and is about 2500 years old. It is built of stone common to this district and is almost circular, 27 metres in diameter. The wall almost 4 metres (13ft) thick at the base and 2 metres (7ft) thick at the top. The north side is still perfect with some of the old coping stones, 90cm (3ft) long, still in position. The wall is 5.5 metres (18ft) high on the north and west sides. It has a square-headed doorway and inside are two small chambers. One on the west side and another on the north. The stairways, which are probably the most interesting feature of the fort, run inside the wall almost to the full height of the wall, and these stairs lead to narrow platforms on which the fort's defenders stood. The fort holds ...read more

The Ewe Sculpture Garden

The Ewe Sculpture Garden

The Ewe Sculpture Garden & Gallery is must see for anyone intrested in art, nature or just a totally unique experience.The perfect destination for a memorable day out. Set along a spectacualr waterfall it is a journey like no other. Slowly explore the mandering pathways and hidden corners. Take the Evolution Walk through the Valley of Eden, weave your past humourous sculptures, and discover a surprise at every turn. The Ewe is a unique combination of nature and art and Ireland's only interactive sculpture garden. Such creative havens can be found in only a few places in Europe. For ten years Sheena Wood and her writer husband, Kurt, ran the successful Ewe Art Centre on the Mizen peninsula. After two years of building work the Glengarriff sculpture garden reopened in 2006 as ...read more

Bunratty Medieval

Bunratty Medieval

Bunratty Castle was built in the 15th century by the Earl of Thomond and stands on the banks of the Rathy River. From here The Earl ruled over his Chiefdom and entertained lavishly, in fact he was famous for his hospitality. Join the Earl of Thomond in the splendour of the main guard of Bunratty Castle for a dinner experience not to be missed! Bunratty Castle, was built in 1425 by the Earl of Thomond. Following his tradition of hospitality, the world renowned Bunratty Medieval Banquet is held twice nightly throughout the year. Since 1963, the Ladies of the Castle, aided and abetted by the Earl's Butler, have welcomed guests from the four corners of the globe to dine at The Earl's Banquet at Bunratty Castle. The entertainment provided by the world renowned Bunratty Singers is a fit...read more

Bunratty Winery

Bunratty Winery

Bunratty Mead was first discovered by Irish Monks in the middle ages. Mead, also spelled meade, has long been called the drink of the High Kings of Ireland. In fact, a form of mead has been around since before the time of Christ. Its seductive aroma is the result of marrying the pure honey and fruit of the vine together with selected herbs, to create this sensual liqueur. In olden times the bride and groom drank Mead for one full moon after their wedding, hence the term honeymoon. Mead is believed to have magical powers of fertility and virility! Potcheen - The original treasured Irish clear smooth spirit which was banned in Ireland since 1661, is now legal. Distilled for centuries for its smooth extra strong taste, this fine potcheen - the first to be legally produced and bottled in Irela...read more

Cork Jazz Festival

Cork Jazz Festival

Guinness Cork Jazz Festival takes place in late October each year in Ireland's scenic southern capital of Cork. It is one of Ireland's flagship arts and cultural events, attracting visitors from all over the world. The festival  has gone from  strength to strength with a outstanding programme of world class jazz and jazz related sounds in over 90 venues. It is renowned as one of the best jazz festivals in Europe. Over the years the many of the top names in jazz have featured including Ella Fitzgerald, Chick Corea , Herbie Hancock , Dizzy Gillespie  and dozens more. There's a superb music trail offering music free of entrance charges and a buzzing Festival Club - plus street entertainment, workshops, lectures, a jazz choir, a Jazz Camp for student musicians, and lots of parti...read more

Lisselan Gardens

Lisselan Gardens

Lisselan Gardens were laid out in Robinsonian style from the early 1850’s. William Bence-Jones chose a site on a promontory above the river for a French chateau style house designed by Lewis Vulliamy. The Bence-Jones family created 30 acres of gardens which take advantage of the natural features and contours provided by the valley and the Argideen River running through it. The gardens are much as they were in their Edwardian hay day containing many spectacular features such as an azalea garden, rockery, Japanese maple, rose wreathed pergola, water garden, and a rhododendron garden. The shrubbery contains mature pines, spruce, holly and more unusual plants including acacia, myrtle, eucalyptus, Robinia and Judas tree. A series of flagstone pathways and rustic bridges add ambience and c...read more

Listowel

Listowel

Listowel is a market town positioned in the very heart of North Kerry in County Kerry, Ireland. Listowel is situated on the River Feale at the head of the North Kerry limestone plain, about 28km (17miles) from the county town, Tralee. Town’s long history dates back to 1303 where it first appears in the Plea Roll. The town developed around Listowel Castle, fortress to the Fitzmaurice family, and its significant Square. The last bastion against Queen Elizabeth I in the Desmond campaign, Listowel Castle was built in the 15th century and was the last fortress of the Geraldines to be subdued. It fell after 28 days siege to Sir Charles Wilmot on the 5th November, 1600, who had the castle's garrison executed in the following days.  The castle became the property of the Hare family, the...read more

Michael Collins Centre

Michael Collins Centre

Michael Collins (1890-1922), Irish revolutionary and chairman of the Provisional Government was born on 16 October 1890 at Woodfield, Clonakilty, County Cork.  The Michael Collins Memorial Centre, in Clonakilty provides a comprehensive presentation, by expert guides, on the life and times of the famous leader with a guided tour of an exhibition of photographs and memorabilia. Tim and Dolores Crowley have been interpreting the life of Michael Collins since 1997, when they organized the first Michael Collins Tours, taking visitors to the important sites in West Cork associated with the famous patriot. The Crowleys opened a Heritage centre on their farm in 2000 and have now designed an ambush trail, a one hundred meter section of road designed to look like a War of Independence/Civil War...read more

Vandeleur Walled Gardens

Vandeleur Walled Gardens

Beautifully constructed old stone walls contain this sheltered walled garden, once the garden of Kilrush House, home to the Vandeleur landlords. Set among four hundred and twenty acres of native woodland, this forgotten garden hadn't been cultivated for many years until restoration work began in 1997. Replanting the borders that line the wall began in spring 2000. It has now been redesigned for the 21st Century around the old path system and specialises in many unusual and tender plants that thrive in the area's uniquely western latitude microclimate. There are a variety of areas for the visitors pleasure including unusual water features, a tree collection, horizontal maze and the summer house. In 2005, the garden was further enhanced with a series of attractive visitor informat...read more